Parental Alienation

Parental Alienation

Parental alienation or interference with a parent-child relationship can have a very serious and very negative impact on a child. The interference can be blatant and aggressive, but often times it is subtle and surreptitiously executed by the other parent. Subtle and surreptitious interference can be just as damaging as blatant interference and can take many forms including but not limited to: mannerisms, body language, the way things are said, facial expressions, keeping a child’s schedule busy in order to keep them away from the other parent, making a child feel as if they are “against” or are hurting a parent if the child spends time with or enjoys the other parent, the manner in which a parent’s voice changes when speaking to or about the other parent, and the like. A child has a right to have a meaningful relationship with both of his or her parents and any interference with that right is taken very seriously by the Court.

A parent engaging in alienating or interfering behaviors can provide proof to the Court that they do not have the ability to foster a meaningful relationship between the other parent and the child(ren) and is, therefore, not a suitable custodial parent. In extreme cases, the Court may determine that the parent engaging in such behaviors should have only supervised or therapeutic contact with the child(ren), or worse, no contact at all.

Proving that a parent has engaged in such behavior requires an experienced and professional attorney who can put together the right legal strategy and team of professionals in order to ensure that custody of the child(ren) is not placed with that parent and that the appropriate level of contact, if any, is ordered by the Court. Likewise, if you are defending an alienation allegation made against you, you will need to ensure that you have the proper legal strategy and team of professionals to assist in your defense. These cases tend to grow and take on a life of their own over time and without the proper legal guidance. Without the proper legal guidance, these cases tend to grow and take on a life of their own.